SEiA 2019 Program

Location: TBD

09:00‑09:15 Opening
Introduction
by Michel R. V. Chaudron
Chalmers | Gothenburg University, Sweden
09:15‑09:50 Keynote Speech 1
Artificial Intelligence & Data Science Research in Africa including case studies of AI for Agriculture and Healthcare
by Joyce Nakatumba-Nabende
Makerere University, Uganda
Session Chair: Michel R. V. Chaudron
09:50‑10:30 Keynote Speech 2
Is Innovation in Africa a Software Engineering problem?
by Hugh Cameron
Visiting Professor, Software and Business Innovation, College of Computing and IS, Makerere University
Session Chair: Michel R. V. Chaudron
10:30‑11:00 Coffee break
11:00‑12:30 Technical session: Data Science & AI and Software Engineering Methodologies
Session Chair: Engineer Bainomugisha
  • Hybrid model of Correlation based Filter Feature Selection and Machine Learning classifiers applied on Smart Meter Dataset
    Omar J. Sinayobye, Swaib Kaawaase Kyanda, Swaib Kaawaase Kyanda, Fred N. Kiwanuka and Richard Musab
    Makerere University & University of Rwanda
  • User-centered Design in Developing Countries: A Case Study of a Sustainable Intercultural Healthcare Platform in Ethiopia
    Rahel Bekele, Iris Groher, Johannes Sametinger, Tesfaye Biru, Christiane Floyd, Gustav Pomberger and Peter Oppelt
    Addis Ababa University, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Mentor Knowledge Systems, University of Hamburg, Kepler University Klinikum
  • Factors Affecting Development Process in Small Software Companies
    Micheal Tuape and Yirsaw Ayalew
    University of Botswana
12:30‑14:00 Lunch break
14:00‑14:40 Keynote Speech 3
Funding for Software Engineering Research in Africa
by Gyaviira Lubowa
Makerere University, Uganda
Session Chair: Evelyn Kahiigi
14:40‑15:30 Discussions & Wrap-up Session Topic: Discussions & Future of 'Software Engineering in Africa' Session Session Chair: Joyce Nakatumba-Nabende
15:30‑16:00 Coffee break

Keynote 1

Title Artificial Intelligence & Data Science Research in Africa including case studies of AI for Agriculture and Healthcare
Keynote Speaker Joyce Nakatumba-Nabende
Artificial Intelligence and Data Science Lab, Makerere University, Uganda
Abstract A key challenge in Africa is the lack of sufficient domain experts to effectively solve the problems in several sectors including: health and agriculture. Despite these difficult problems a number of enormous technology-driven changes through Artificial Intelligence (AI), provides hope by enabling the automation of these different expert tasks. This talk will highlight examples of interventions where AI has been employed by the AI and Data Science research lab (AIR) in Makerere University to address some of these challenges. The talk will discuss how automation of plant disease diagnosis has been carried out in the field on smartphones. Using crowdsourcing, we will highlight how surveillance data from farmers is collected and how this impacts the livelihoods of these farmers. We will also give some examples in other fields like health where AI is impacting the livelihoods of people in Africa.

Keynote 2

Title Is Innovation in Africa a Software Engineering problem?
Keynote Speaker Hugh Cameron
Visiting Professor, Software and Business Innovation, College of Computing and IS, Makerere Universitya
Abstract To innovate is to carry out creative changes that increase wealth. Africa certainly needs and wants innovation, in order to become wealthier. A popular fallacy is that innovations depend on breakthroughs or leapfrogging technology, that they must be disruptive. Fortunately this is false, especially in Africa where societies are already compressing two centuries of social and demographic disruption into a few decades. But all sustainable innovation in the 21st century requires software, because whatever does not make effective use of software, will be out-competed, surrounded and supplanted by that which does. The effective use of such new software does not just happen; it has to be engineered – for the users, their organisations, and their culture.
This paper argues that there is a set of practices and capabilities for innovation that can be learned by a group of people, just as there is a set of technologies and tools that a software engineering organisation progressively masters like the ascending rungs of a ladder. To illustrate this progression, we draw on a variety of examples from East Africa since 2010, involving both innovation and software engineering in health care, international aid, commerce, education, agriculture and governance. From the same examples, we also show a way forward for both software engineering and innovation in Africa.